Thursday, December 27, 2012

Hear hear: On the us' unregulated Internet telecom monopoly

Captive Audience: Power of telecom, cable industry is growing

BroadbandOpinion: In the first of three excerpts from "Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age," author Susan Crawford examines the growing power of the telecom industry.

Saturday, December 15, 2012

Spotted: combining multiple input textures into one mew texture

Multi-exemplar inhomogeneous texture synthesis

Available online 13 November 2012
Publication year: 2012
Source:Computers & Graphics

This paper presents a new framework for the semi-automatic synthesis of an inhomogeneous texture from a theoretically infinite number of input exemplars. Our algorithm generates a result with natural multiway transitions, maintaining a reasonable synthesis time to keep interactivity. We introduce intermediate textures between multiple exemplars, called ‘transition textures’ which enables our algorithm to produce smooth transitions between input exemplar patches. We also propose ‘image index correction’ to achieve a synthesis speed that is independent of the number of input exemplars by smart placement of transition-texture samples. Our algorithm is semiautomatic, spatially deterministic and well suited to acceleration via parallel processors. Also, our algorithm can easily control the synthesis result to design a texture visual with user interactions.

Graphical abstract

image 

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Find: Local group focusing on women and coding

http://www.exitevent.com/girl-develop-it-levels-field-for-lady-coders-12125.asp

Fast-Growing New York Non-Profit Is Setting Up Shop in Durham

Two New York women were tired of being the only female coders in the workplace, tech meetups, in life in general.

So they started Girl Develop It to teach other women to code. And then word spread to other cities, and more women began hosting classes in CSS, HTML, Wordpress and more.

Sydney, Austin, Detroit, Ottawa, Cincinnati.... and now Raleigh/Durham.

Raleigh native Rachael Hobbs is behind the new group, kicking off its first set of four classes January 9 at Relevance Inc. in Durham. Hobbs isn't necessarily a feminist, but the reality is that her efforts could be a key way to grow the pool of Triangle women working for startups and founding tech companies.

In cities where Girl Develop It chapters have formed, women meet at coffee shops on weekends to code together and share their learnings. They've passed beginner classes and moved on to startup-friendly courses on Ruby on Rails, Django and mobile app development.

"I'm really looking for input from people that would be interested in classes to see what they'd like to learn," Hobbs says. The key to Girl Develop It is a collaborative and open environment where no question is a dumb one.

Julia Elman of Chapel Hill's Caktus Group will teach the first class of 20, open to both men and women and focused on CSS and HTML. Four two-hour classes cost $80. Hobbs hopes to eventually offer scholarships.

To be successful in the Triangle, Hobbs has some needs: More instructors and teaching assistants for future classes, classroom space in Raleigh, and good venues to host social events. She also needs the startup community to spread the word widely.

Hobbs believes Girl Develop It will help further her career at a local environmental data management company. But mostly, she hopes to build new skills in others and give something back to her hometown.

Monday, December 10, 2012

Spotted: finding 3d models to complete scene using co-occurrence in text

I wonder what else we could use textual relationships for. 

Scholar Alert - [ author:Pat author:Hanrahan ]

Using Text N-Grams for Model Suggestions in 3D Scenes <[link]>
L Lam, S Lin, P *Hanrahan*
Abstract Creating 3D scenes requires artistic skill and is time-consuming. A key challenge is...

Sunday, December 09, 2012

The pc becomes a console (again), and valve leads the charge

Gabe Newell says Valve will release its own console-like PC for the living room

Big picture mode

Valve has stayed mostly quiet about its plans to enter the hardware business, but in an interview with Kotaku at last night's Video Game Awards, Gabe Newell confirmed the company's plans to sell its own living room PC that could compete with next-generation consoles from Sony and Microsoft. The biggest revelation is that Valve seems set to release its own complete hardware and software solution. When we first reported that the company was working on a "Steam Box" back in March, it appeared that Valve was working on a prototype that would establish a baseline for hardware manufacturers, but it wasn't clear if the company would sell its own product or simply release the designs to others. Newell's comments to Kotaku provide a much clearer...

Saturday, December 08, 2012

Find: nvidia tries to make sure gaming experience good as possible across platorms

With desktop flexibility comes complexity, and complexity isn't good experience. 

How Nvidia's GeForce Experience harnesses meat and machine to make default game settings gorgeous

Gallery Photo: GeForce GTX 680 vs. Radeon HD 7970

In April, Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang told us that the days of painstakingly tweaking PC game settings to get a decent gaming experience could soon be over. With GeForce Experience, he said, the company would use supercomputers to figure out the optimal settings for each game and each hardware configuration, by tailoring settings to your computer. Today, the tool enters closed beta, supporting around 30 games to start. We got to try it out for ourselves this week, and sat down with some Nvidia engineers to see how it works.

First of all, you should probably know that Nvidia isn't actually scanning your laptop or desktop with a cloud-based supercomputer and magically calculating the results. It's mostly human labor, actually, and it...

Thursday, December 06, 2012

Find: More big changes at Epic - Mike Capps Retiring to the Epic Board

Congrats to Mike!

Mike Capps Retiring to the Epic Board

By Mike Capps

It’s hard to believe I’m writing these words, but here goes! After 10 crazy and wonderful years, I’m handing off my current presidential duties at Epic, and transitioning into an advisory role as well as remaining on the Epic board of directors.

If you haven’t heard, I have a baby boy on the way. I’m fortunate that with Epic’s success and generosity, I can be a stay at home dad for a while. My wife Julianne and I are very happy in Raleigh, and other than cleaning up baby barf, I don’t have much planned. I might do some teaching, spend more time on creative writing, and maybe get more active with a few charities.

After dedicating a decade of my life to Epic, and with so many close friends here, it’s impossible to just walk away. I absolutely love this company. If you cut me, I think I probably bleed nanoblack and Imulsion. (Wow, just think about what mixing those would do…) Epic founder and CEO Tim Sweeney and other board members asked me to stay on the board, and I’m thrilled to do so as I’m truly excited about our future games and Unreal Engine 4.

As I mentioned above, I’ll continue to be available as a resource to Epic, to provide context or advice where I can. Whatever I can do to help in Epic’s success, I’m in! I’ve got great confidence in our executive team – VP of Development Paul Meegan is new to our Raleigh HQ, but we’ve worked with him for years, and I can only contemplate this retirement knowing that he and VP of Operations John Farnsworth can manage development better than I ever did.

Our partners and customers can reach me anytime on my Epic email address, and I’ll still be posting the occasional foodie and gamer musings on @epicactual. As a member of the board, I’ll help keep the ship pointed directly towards Na Pali, and make sure that everything we do is Epic.

Monday, December 03, 2012

Spotted: On subway maps, curved can be better than straight

Though viewers may not like it. 

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Objective versus subjective measures of Paris Metro map Usability:Investigating Traditional Octolinear versus All-Curves Schematics

Available online 10 October 2012
Publication year: 2012
Source:International Journal of Human-Computer Studies

Schematic maps are an important component of assistance for navigating transport networks worldwide. By showing routes as simple straight lines, they reduce the cognitive load of journey planning, and by revealing the underlying structure of networks, they make their key features easier to identify and learn. However, although there are many suggestions for optimizing schematic maps so as to maximize these benefits, to date these have not been directly supported by published usability studies or psychological theory. In this paper, we suggest that there are circumstances in which conventional schematic maps fail to yield benefits, and we compare journey planning using the current official RATP Paris Metro map with an All-Curves design which replaces straight lines and corners with gentle curves. Three separate usability studies with slightly different methodologies showed that the journey planning time for the All-Curves map was better then the RATP version, with effect sizes ranging from 0.48 to 1.12. Subjective usability ratings were derived from questionnaires, and user preferences, but neither were correlated with objective usability measures. We conclude that (1) in terms of designing schematics, there is no evidence to suggest that any rule-set can be claimed to be a gold-standard, and it is important to match the design rules to the properties of the network, (2) in some circumstances, radical departures from traditional ideas can yield usability benefits, and (3) map usability appears to be distinct from map engagement, although the latter is undoubtedly important in encouraging people fully to make use of navigation aides.

Highlights

► Two Paris Metro maps are compared, official octolinear design and all-curves design. ► All curves design better than octolinear design for objective usability measures. ► No relationships between objective usability measures and subjective ratings. ► For complex networks, breaking traditional design rules can improve usability.

Spotted: More graphics than text makes web viewers feel the page is easier to navigate

How will the use of graphics affect visual aesthetics? A user-centered approach for web page design

Available online 26 October 2012
Publication year: 2012
Source:International Journal of Human-Computer Studies
This paper addresses new and significant research issues in web page design in relation to the use of graphics. The original findings include that (a) graphics play an important role in enhancing the appearance and thus users' feelings (aesthetics) about web pages and that (b) the effective use of graphics is crucial in designing web pages. In addition, we have developed a web page design support database based on a user-centered experimental procedure and a neural network model. This design support database can be used to examine how a specific combination of design elements, particularly the ratio of graphics to text, will affect the users' feelings about a web page. As a general rule, the ratio of graphics to text between 3:1 and 1:1 will give the users the best feelings of ease-to-use and clear-to-follow. A web page with a ratio of 1:1 will have the most realistic look, while a ratio of over 3:1 will have the fanciest appearance. The result provides useful insights in using graphics on web pages that help web designers best meet users' specific expectations and aesthetic consistency.

Highlights

► The first impression of users is strongly influenced by the web page appearance. ► Graphics play an important role in enhancing the visual aesthetics of web pages. ► Most influential elements are “Ratio of Graphics to Text” and “Hyperlink Style”. ► The ratio between 3:1 and 1:1 shows the feelings of ease-to-use and clear-to-follow. ► The result helps designers best meet users' specific expectations and web aesthetics.

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Spotted: how differences in cognition and personality affect visualization - Understanding Visualization by Understanding Individual Users,

Understanding Visualization by Understanding Individual Users

Visualization is often seen as a tool to support complex thinking. Although different people can have very different ways of approaching the kind of complex task that visualizations support, as researchers and designers we still rarely consider individual differences in creating and evaluating visualizations. This article reviews recent research on individual differences in visualization and human-computer interaction, showing that both cognitive abilities and personality profiles might significantly affect performance with these tools. The study of individual differences has led to the conclusion that advances in this important area in visualization will require more focused research. Specifically, we must isolate the cognitive factors that are relevant to visualization and the design factors that make one visualization more suited to a user than another. In doing so, we could increase our understanding of the visualization user and reshape how we approach design and evaluation.

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Spotted: Well said! Experiential Media and Digital Culture

PrePrint: Experiential Media and Digital Culture

The role of digital media in our daily experiences is increasing, leading to the emergence of new forms of hybrid physical-digital knowledge via devices such as the smartphone. However, the lack of integration structures merging this knowledge into a coherent digital culture is hindering the development of unifying solutions to complex, societal problems. We believe that a broad integration of knowledge across engineering, arts, design, humanities and the social sciences is required. Additionally, a core value system and design approach that focuses on combining efficiency, reflection and quality of experience goals are necessary in fostering a true hybrid physical-digital culture.


Spotted: bsp-like depth sorting without splitting - Depth-presorted triangle lists

Worth a closer look. 

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Depth-presorted triangle lists

Ge Chen, Pedro V. Sander, Diego Nehab, Lei Yang, Liang Hu

We present a novel approach for real-time rendering of static 3D models front-to-back or back-to-front relative to any viewpoint outside its bounding volume. The approach renders depth-sorted triangles using a single draw-call. At run-time, we replace the traditional sorting strategy of existing algorithms with a faster triangle selection strategy. The selection process operates on an extended sequence of triangles annotated by test planes, created by our off-line preprocessing stage. Based on these test planes, a simple run-time procedure uses the given viewpoint to select a subsequence of triangles for rasterization. Selected subsequences are statically presorted by depth and contain each input triangle exactly once.

Spotted: indystate - why is android the majority in devices and the minority online? The Android engagement paradox

Because the online experience is worse. But why?

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The Android engagement paradox

IBM’s Digital Analytics Benchmark reported US Black Friday sales and the news is reasonably good. Overall online sales grew by 17.4% while mobile grew to make up 24% of traffic.
The data goes further to show the split between device types. I illustrate this split with the following graphs:

Of the 24% of traffic made up by mobile devices, phones contributed 13% and tablets 11% (or 54% and 46% of mobile respectively). Of the phone traffic, iOS devices were about two thirds of traffic and Android one third. Of tablet traffic, iPad was 88%, Kindle and Nook were 5.5% Galaxy Tab was 1.8% and other tablets were 4.4%.
Overall, iOS was 77% generated mobile traffic and Android (excl. Kindle, Nook) was 23%.

Spotted: Soft shadows with gpu ray tracing - Axis-aligned filtering for interactive sampled soft shadows

Axis-aligned filtering for interactive sampled soft shadows

Soham Uday Mehta, Brandon Wang, Ravi Ramamoorthi

We develop a simple and efficient method for soft shadows from planar area light sources, based on explicit occlusion calculation by raytracing, followed by adaptive image-space filtering. Since the method is based on Monte Carlo sampling, it is accurate. Since the filtering is in image-space, it adds minimal overhead and can be performed at real-time frame rates. We obtain interactive speeds, using the Optix GPU raytracing framework. Our technical approach derives from recent work on frequency analysis and sheared pixel-light filtering for offline soft shadows. While sample counts can be reduced dramatically, the sheared filtering step is slow, adding minutes of overhead.

CG still doesn't have a good image quality measure - New measurements reveal weaknesses of image quality metrics in evaluating graphics artifacts

And near as I can tell, they aren't great for compression either. 

New measurements reveal weaknesses of image quality metrics in evaluating graphics artifacts

Martin Čadík, Robert Herzog, Rafał Mantiuk, Karol Myszkowski, Hans-Peter Seidel

Reliable detection of global illumination and rendering artifacts in the form of localized distortion maps is important for many graphics applications. Although many quality metrics have been developed for this task, they are often tuned for compression/transmission artifacts and have not been evaluated in the context of synthetic CG-images. In this work, we run two experiments where observers use a brush-painting interface to directly mark image regions with noticeable/objectionable distortions in the presence/absence of a high-quality reference image, respectively. The collected data shows a relatively high correlation between the with-reference and no-reference observer markings. Also, our demanding per-pixel image-quality datasets reveal weaknesses of both simple (PSNR, MSE, sCIE-Lab) and advanced (SSIM, MS-SSIM, HDR-VDP-2) quality metrics.

Find: Beautiful and meaningful - Watch the beauty of public transit unfold in New York, Boston, and other cities around the world

Watch the beauty of public transit unfold in New York, Boston, and other cities around the world

nyc traffic video

YouTube user STLTransit has a wonderful collection of videos that visualize the movements of the public transit systems of various locations — turning public transit data into a flowing display of a city's daily life. Each video shows the ebb and flow of traffic during a single day, with various transit systems like bus and rail shown in different colors. The result is a brief but exciting glimpse at our world — a satellite's view of a city's living protoplasm on the streets below.

Monday, November 26, 2012

Competition: apps for NC State EI's Silicon Valley trip due tomorrow

NC State EI (@ncsuei)

11/26/12, 10:01 AM

Don't forget! Applications to participate in the EI's Spring Break trip to Silicon Valley are due tomorrow at noon! tinyurl.com/d2cypox

Spotted: Lights and displays look brightest between 10 and 20 hz - good for lights, bad for displays

Need to look closer to find how much brighter. 

---

Scientists discover ways to optimize light sources for vision: Tuning lighting devices could save billions
Vision researchers have made a groundbreaking discovery into the optimization of light sources to human vision. By tuning lighting devices to work more efficiently with the human brain, the researchers believe billions of dollars in energy costs could be saved.

Find: Kleiner Perkins adds Design Fellows program to promote design in technology

Kleiner Perkins adds Design Fellows program to promote design in technology

Coming off the success of the investment firm’s engineering fellows program, Kleiner Perkins is launching a Design Fellows Program on Tuesday that will give promising design students a three-month internship with top companies in Kleiner Perkins’ portfolio to hone their design skills. Kleiner Perkins’ decision to place design students in top tech firms puts a particular emphasis on the importance of connecting design and technology.

“The importance of design as a critical part of product development and a vital strategy for companies to win in the marketplace is increasing, and KPCB sees design as a key factor in evaluating today’s consumer digital investment opportunities,” the firm noted in a press release.

Kleiner Perkins Design Fellows will work with on “design challenges” with one of the company’s funded companies, including Coursera, Flipboard, Klout, Nest, One Kings Lane, Opower, Path, Shopkick, Square and Zaarly.

The company will also pair the Design Fellows with members of the Design Council, to provide mentoring and leadership opportunities. Design Council members include: Zach Klein, DIY; Sahil Lavingia, Gumroad; Elle Luna, Mailbox; Gentry Underwood, Mailbox; Marcos Weskamp, Flipboard; Wesley Yun, Samsung; and Matt Beebe, Tylr Mobile.

We’ve talked a lot this month about the importance of the marrying of good design and tech, particularly at our recent RoadMap conference, in the future of business and innovation in Silicon Valley:

But now that computers and connectivity are ubiquitous, design is a vital part of how the best hardware, software, services, and systems are created: good design is the difference between products that make our lives better and those that make our lives more difficult.

Kleiner Perkins has already offered a similar program with its Engineers Fellows program, now in its second year of accepting applications, providing promising engineering students with summer internships at Kleiner Perkins companies and funding to relocate for the summer.

The Design Fellows program will begin accepting applications on Tuesday and will run through January 31, 2013.

Saturday, November 24, 2012

Find: Haha! Good idea - WTFlevel measures humanity's discontent in real-time by tracking profane tweets

WTFlevel measures humanity's discontent in real-time by tracking profane tweets

fire alarm bell stock 1024

Twitter is a gushing spigot of fleeting human experiences, ranging from angst over pumpkin spice latte outages, to life in modern warfare, to the wondrous aphorisms of an equine sage — and there's plenty of profanity amid all the sound and fury. Thankfully, web developer Colin Mitchell has created "WTFlevel:" a simple website that tracks and graphs the amount of swearing on Twitter in real-time. Mitchell says it's "mostly a humorous attempt to get an idea of how aggravated the planet is at any moment," and the system uses a color-coded threat level system ranging from "mostly polite" to "oh &@#?@&!" to convey the level of profanity being spoken on Twitter at any given time. The list of swear words is secret, but all of the usual seven...

Spotted: Machines model our emotional response to art - Computers identify what makes abstract art move us

Computers identify what makes abstract art move us

Analysing images to find what aspects evoke which feelings could allow computers to create art that packs an emotional punch

Spotted: on why shadows and indirect reflection matter

Find: Good idea - iRotate grasp: automatic screen rotation based on grasp of mobile devices

Though maybe not the best implementation. 

iRotate grasp: automatic screen rotation based on grasp of mobile devices

Lung-Pan Cheng, Fang-I Hsiao, Yen-Ting Liu, Mike Y. Chen

Automatic screen rotation improves viewing experience and usability of mobile devices, but current gravity-based approaches do not support postures such as lying on one side, and manual rotation switches require explicit user input. iRotate Grasp automatically rotates screens of mobile devices to match users' viewing orientations based on how users are grasping the devices. Our insight is that users' grasps are consistent for each orientation, but significantly differ between different orientations. Our prototype embeds a total of 32 light sensors along the four sides and the back of an iPod Touch, and uses support vector machine (SVM) to recognize grasps at 25Hz.

Friday, November 23, 2012

Find: measuring visual online experience - How online video stream quality affects viewer behavior

a/b testing codecs and routers. Result: it matters a lot. 

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How online video stream quality affects viewer behavior

It may seem like common sense that the quality of online video streaming affects how willing viewers are to watch videos at a website. But until computer science researchers developed a way to rigorously study the question, no one had been able to scientifically test the assumption.

Spotted: Learning about MTurk and similar - Human computation, a survey and taxonomy of a growing field

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Find: How Obama used web & cloud tech - Deep inside Obama's campaign tech

Built to win: Deep inside Obama's campaign tech



The tech unit's sign, autographed by its members.

The reelection of Barack Obama was won by people, not by software. But in a contest as close as last week's election, software may have given the Obama for America organization's people a tiny edge—making them by some measures more efficient, better connected, and more engaged than the competition.

That edge was provided by the work of a group of people unique in the history of presidential politics: Team Tech, a dedicated internal team of technology professionals who operated like an Internet startup, leveraging a combination of open source software, Web services, and cloud computing power. The result was the sort of numbers any startup would consider a success. As Scott VanDenPlas, the head of the Obama technology team's DevOps group, put it in a tweet:

4Gb/s, 10k requests per second, 2,000 nodes, 3 datacenters, 180TB and 8.5 billion requests. Design, deploy, dismantle in 583 days to elect the President. #madops

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Job: Postdoctoral positions in personalized accessibility and healthcare at Harvard

Begin forwarded message:

From: Krzysztof Gajos <kgajos@EECS.HARVARD.EDU>
Subject: Postdoctoral positions in topics related to personalized accessibility and healthcare at Harvard
Date: 17 November 2012 11:30:25 AM EST

Harvard Center for Research on Computation and Society (CRCS) has a number of postdoctoral fellowships available.  CRCS supports a number of topic areas of broad relevance to society.  For this community, I'd like to point out that we are specifically looking for people with HCI-ish backgrounds interested in personalized accessibility or healthcare.  More info at http://crcs.seas.harvard.edu/postdoctoral-fellowship/ and the full ad is also below. Please forward as appropriate.  Apply by Dec 16 (ideally).  Apply even if you are looking for faculty positions: a number of CRCS fellows already have faculty positions when they join, but they choose to defer for a year to build up their research agendas and connections at CRCS.
Yours,
Krzysztof

Monday, November 12, 2012

Spotted: how people choose summarizing phrases - Descriptive keyphrases for text visualization

“Without the clutter of unimportant words”: Descriptive keyphrases for text visualization

Jason Chuang, Christopher D. Manning, Jeffrey Heer

Keyphrases aid the exploration of text collections by communicating salient aspects of documents and are often used to create effective visualizations of text. While prior work in HCI and visualization has proposed a variety of ways of presenting keyphrases, less attention has been paid to selecting the best descriptive terms. In this article, we investigate the statistical and linguistic properties of keyphrases chosen by human judges and determine which features are most predictive of high-quality descriptive phrases. Based on 5,611 responses from 69 graduate students describing a corpus of dissertation abstracts, we analyze characteristics of human-generated keyphrases, including phrase length, commonness, position, and part of speech.

Spotted: a good read for architecture aware improvements? Scalable ambient obscurance

Luebke and McGuire always do good work. 

Scalable ambient obscurance

Morgan McGuire, Michael Mara, David Luebke

This paper presents a set of architecture-aware performance and integration improvements for a recent screenspace ambient obscurance algorithm. These improvements collectively produce a 7 x performance increase at 2560 x1600, generalize the algorithm to both forward and deferred renderers, and eliminate the radius- and scene-dependence of the previous algorithm to provide a hard real-time guarantee of fixed execution time.

Spotted: Again, thought provoking - Power efficiency for software algorithms running on graphics processors

Akenine Moeller chooses problems well. 

Power efficiency for software algorithms running on graphics processors

Björn Johnsson, Per Ganestam, Michael Doggett, Tomas Akenine-Möller

Power efficiency has become the most important consideration for many modern computing devices. In this paper, we examine power efficiency of a range of graphics algorithms on different GPUs. To measure power consumption, we have built a power measuring device that samples currents at a high frequency. Comparing power efficiency of different graphics algorithms is done by measuring power and performance of three different primary rendering algorithms and three different shadow algorithms. We measure these algorithms' power signatures on a mobile phone, on an integrated CPU and graphics processor, and on high-end discrete GPUs, and then compare power efficiency across both algorithms and GPUs.

Sunday, November 11, 2012

Find: OpenNews - the future of reporting is at the growing intersection of news, storytelling and web tech

OpenNews: looking back, moving forward.

This is the second of three posts about the state of development in journalism, where we’re at with the Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project, and where we’re going. It caps off on Thursday with the announcement of the 2013 Knight-Mozilla Fellows, an announcement that then launches us into the Mozilla Festival in London, starting Friday

With the Mozilla Festival approaching in just two days, and the announcemnet of our 2013 Fellows happening tomorrow, it’s a nice moment to reflect on how far the Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project has come in 2012 and where we’re going in 2013.

Writing this in the looming shadow of a trans-Atlantic flight to London for the Mozilla Festival, it’s actually pretty overwhelming just how far our project has transformed since I “thought out loud” about opportunites in the intersection of journalism and tech prior to last year’s Mozilla Festival. So it’s time for a little more thinking out loud, both about where we’ve been this year, and where we’re going next.

OpenNews 2012: there and back again

Back in February, we announced a new name and an “evolved” focus for the newly-christened Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project. The idea was to keep our Fellowship program intact, but to build out a much larger program dedicated to growing the community around coding and journalism. Here’s how we did:

Hack Days: We went into 2012 with a new initiative to sponsor, promote, and support hack days around the world that adopted journalistic themes. I firmly believe that if you want to grow the community around tech and journalism, you need to engage people in a way that demonstrates this is a place hackers, developers, and engineers want to play. Hack days are incredibly effective in doing that, and here as we approach the end of year, we will have helped sponsor more than 20 hack days around the world, with over 2000 participants.

Source: Throughout 2012, I’ve been incredibly lucky to work with the talented Erin Kissane and Ryan Pitts to create Source, a website designed to be a centerpoint for the journo-code community. Launched last month after being in a public beta since the Summer, we’ve been able to collect looks at how news devs reacted to Hurricane Sandy, dis...

Friday, November 09, 2012

Find: milestone - Qualcomm surpasses Intel as most valuable chip firm

There's the -- that was the mobile train going by. Q is smart: their wireless chips are in both apple and android devices. They have a local r&d office, too. 

Qualcomm surpasses Intel as most valuable chip firm

Qualcomm technology powers e-reader screen.Booming smartphone and mobile device demand drives value of Qualcomm past that of Intel as PC market lags.

Find: milestone - Qualcomm surpasses Intel as most valuable chip firm

There's the -- that was the mobile train going by. Q is smart: their wireless chips are in both apple and android devices. They have a local r&d office, too. 

Qualcomm surpasses Intel as most valuable chip firm

Qualcomm technology powers e-reader screen.Booming smartphone and mobile device demand drives value of Qualcomm past that of Intel as PC market lags.

Wednesday, November 07, 2012

Find: HUB Raleigh Contributes To The Evolution of Co-working in Downtown

When you turn your idea into a startup....

HUB Raleigh Contributes To The Evolution of Co-working in Downtown

Office space at HUB Raleigh


Last week, HUB Raleigh had its official grand opening. This co-working space on Hillsborough Street adds to the growing startup scene and Innovate Raleigh initiative that continues to spread around downtown Raleigh. The space is set up for established startups in the area to work from so that they can tap the greater HUB network for future growth. I went to the packed grand opening party and returned the next day for a visit.


We’ve talked about co-working before and while I myself do not work for a startup, the community aspect around a co-working space is a natural fit for downtown. Both sides can benefit from the social aspect at HUB and the close proximity to the services in the downtown districts.


I like to compare co-working to the idea of our “third place.” There’s where you live, (first) where you work, (second) and your regular place to socialize. (third) This is a theme that is very alive and true for downtown regulars. With co-working, the community aspect of a third place is weaved into the work aspect of the second. For most, this creates relationships, personal and business, that really help create new businesses and bring ideas into creation.


Others just want to get out of the house and that’s fine too.


Grand opening party at HUB Raleigh

Grand opening party at HUB Raleigh


HUB Raleigh is slowly trying to create that community between visitors and users. For example, they have a calendar where anyone can post an event from business to social. The Click Cafe is the HUB’s on-site gathering space for breaks over food and drinks. And as community goes, HUB has members that are active in Durham’s startup scene and other places around the triangle. HUB contributes to what is going on in the triangle rather then compete and possibly take away.


I mentioned the HUB network that members are a part of. HUB is part of a 28 location network, mostly with locations in North America and Europe, where members have access to those locations and the community around it. If a startup in Raleigh decides to work in San Francisco, HUB San Francisco is now a place for them to reach to if needed. This network helps startups ease into different areas and HUB Raleigh helps visitors ease into here.


Growing startups like The ...

Find: HUB Raleigh Contributes To The Evolution of Co-working in Downtown

When you turn your idea into a startup....

HUB Raleigh Contributes To The Evolution of Co-working in Downtown

Office space at HUB Raleigh


Last week, HUB Raleigh had its official grand opening. This co-working space on Hillsborough Street adds to the growing startup scene and Innovate Raleigh initiative that continues to spread around downtown Raleigh. The space is set up for established startups in the area to work from so that they can tap the greater HUB network for future growth. I went to the packed grand opening party and returned the next day for a visit.


We’ve talked about co-working before and while I myself do not work for a startup, the community aspect around a co-working space is a natural fit for downtown. Both sides can benefit from the social aspect at HUB and the close proximity to the services in the downtown districts.


I like to compare co-working to the idea of our “third place.” There’s where you live, (first) where you work, (second) and your regular place to socialize. (third) This is a theme that is very alive and true for downtown regulars. With co-working, the community aspect of a third place is weaved into the work aspect of the second. For most, this creates relationships, personal and business, that really help create new businesses and bring ideas into creation.


Others just want to get out of the house and that’s fine too.


Grand opening party at HUB Raleigh

Grand opening party at HUB Raleigh


HUB Raleigh is slowly trying to create that community between visitors and users. For example, they have a calendar where anyone can post an event from business to social. The Click Cafe is the HUB’s on-site gathering space for breaks over food and drinks. And as community goes, HUB has members that are active in Durham’s startup scene and other places around the triangle. HUB contributes to what is going on in the triangle rather then compete and possibly take away.


I mentioned the HUB network that members are a part of. HUB is part of a 28 location network, mostly with locations in North America and Europe, where members have access to those locations and the community around it. If a startup in Raleigh decides to work in San Francisco, HUB San Francisco is now a place for them to reach to if needed. This network helps startups ease into different areas and HUB Raleigh helps visitors ease into here.


Growing startups like The ...

Job: Sas needs c++ graphics programmer

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Himesh Patel
Date: Monday, October 29, 2012
Subject: Looking for candidate...

Hi Ben,

 I have an open position coming up, I am looking for someone with strong objective C , and/or c++ programming knowledge with graphics. Let me know if you have any one. I will email you the full requirement soon.

Thanks

Himesh

Data Visualization R&D

 

Job: Sas needs c++ graphics programmer

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Himesh Patel
Date: Monday, October 29, 2012
Subject: Looking for candidate...

Hi Ben,

 I have an open position coming up, I am looking for someone with strong objective C , and/or c++ programming knowledge with graphics. Let me know if you have any one. I will email you the full requirement soon.

Thanks

Himesh

Data Visualization R&D

 

Friday, October 26, 2012

Talk: NCSU Future of Games Series - Advancing AR as a New Medium: Authoring, Evaluation, and Deployment, Maribeth Gandy, Georgia Tech - Tuesday at 10

Forwarded message:
From: R. Michael Young <young@csc.ncsu.edu>

Future of Games Speaker Series

Speaker: Maribeth Gandy , Interactive Media Technology Center, Georgia Tech

Title: Advancing AR as a New Medium: Authoring, Evaluation, and Deployment

Date: Tuesday October 30, 2012
Time: 10:00 AM
Place: 3211, EBII; NCSU Centennial Campus (click for courtesy parking request)

Abstract:

Augmented Reality (AR) overlays virtual content, such as computer generated graphics, on the physical world. The augmented view of the world can be presented to the user via a head mounted display, a tablet/mobile device, or projection on the physical space around the user. While Ivan Sutherland first presented the concept of the “Ultimate Display� in 1965, it was not possible to truly implement augmented reality applications until almost 25 years later. Therefore, the field of AR research is usually considered to have begun in the early 90’s. In this 20-year period, AR has gone from being viewed as a heavyweight technology, only appropriate for industrial and military applications, to a new medium for art, games and entertainment applications. The evolution of the field is due in part to the extensive research that has gone into exploring the AR application space, but also the recent rise of powerful mobile devices that make it easy to deploy a wide-variety of AR appl!
ications to consumers.

This is a critical moment for the field of AR. Over the past three years, AR technology has become accessible outside of computer science research labs. At first this was mainly HCI researchers, but now we see participation from a variety of groups including game developers, visual and performance artists, user experience experts, toy designers, web developers, and entrepreneurs. As a result, there is an increased demand for tools and techniques to support AR experience design, evaluation, development, and deployment that fully address the needs of these diverse groups.

Low-level AR research in computer vision, graphics, sensors, and optics is, of course, critical to the success and growth of AR. However, my research focuses on higher level questions regarding what applications are appropriate for AR, how effective AR applications can be designed, and, most importantly, how we can support the participation of makers from outside the AR research domain. In this talk I will discuss the three intertwined research domains that are critical to the advancement of AR as a new medium: authoring, evaluation, and deployment.

Short Bio:

Maribeth Gandy is the Director of the Interactive Media Technology Center and the Associate Director of Interactive Media in the Institute for People and Technology at Georgia Tech. She received a B.S. in Computer Engineering as well as a M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Georgia Tech. In her twelve years as a research faculty member her work has been focused on the intersection of technology for augmented reality, accessibility/disability, human computer interaction, and gaming. She has developed computer-based experiences for entertainment and informal education in a variety of forms including augmented reality, virtual, and mobile. She also teaches the “Video Game Design” and “Computer Audio” course in the College of Computing at Georgia Tech. In her AR research, she is interested in advancing AR as a new medium by focusing on authoring, evaluation, and deployment. She was the lead architect on a large open source software project called the Designer’s Augmented R!
eality Toolkit (DART), which had thousands of users and was used to create a variety of large-scale AR systems. She was also co-PI on an NSF grant focused on the development of presence metrics for measuring engagement in AR environments using qualitative and quantitative data. She is currently collaborating on the creation of an open source AR web browser called Argon. She is also interested in the use of gaming interfaces for health and wellness. Currently, she is the co-PI on an NSF grant exploring the concept of cognitive gaming for older adults. The goal is to both isolate what components are necessary in an activity for it to have general cognitive benefits and to craft a custom game based on these guidelines that is accessible and compelling for an older player. Previously, she led a project funded by Georgia Tech’s Health Systems Institute to develop home-based computer games for stroke rehabilitation. For seven years she worked in the fields of disability and acce!
ssibility as a project director in the Wireless RERC (through !
the Shep
ard Center in Atlanta and Georgia Tech) and generated guidelines for the universal design and user centered design process with disabled persons. In her consulting work she has built commercial games, designed a home medical device for older adults, enhanced live rock concerts, and worked with startup companies to develop AR business models and products.

Talk: Future of Games Series - Virtual Humans by Stacy Marsella, USC/ICT - Monday at 11

Forwarded message:
From: R. Michael Young <young@csc.ncsu.edu>

Future of Games Speaker Series

Speaker: Stacy Marsella , USC/ICT

Talk Title: Virtual Humans

Date: Monday October 29, 2012
Time: 11:00 AM
Place: 3211, EBII; NCSU Centennial Campus (click for courtesy parking request)

Abstract:

Virtual humans are autonomous virtual characters that can have meaningful interactions with human users. They can reason about the environment, understand and express emotion, and communicate using speech and gesture. I will discuss various application areas of virtual humans in education, health intervention and entertainment. I will then go on to discuss the design of virtual humans with specific focus on their expressive capabilities.

Short Bio:

Stacy C. Marsella is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Southern California, Associate Director of Social Simulation Research at the Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT) and a co-director of USC’s Computational Emotion Group. His general research interest is in the computational modeling of cognition, emotion and social behavior, both as a basic research methodology in the study of human behavior as well as the use of these computational models in a range of gaming and analysis applications. His current research spans the interplay of emotion and cognition, modeling of the influence that beliefs about the mental processes of others have on social interaction and the role of nonverbal behavior in face-to-face interaction. He has extensive experience in the application of these models to the design of virtual humans, software entities that look human and can interact with humans in a virtual environment using spoken!
dialog. He is an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing and a member of the steering committee of the Intelligent Virtual Agents conference, as well as a member of the International Society for Research on Emotions (ISRE). Professor Marsella has published over 150 technical articles and received the Association for Computing Machinery's (ACM/SIGART) 2010 Autonomous Agents Research Award, for research influencing the field of autonomous agents.

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Event: NSF Fellowship Application Reviews @ Thu Oct 25 6:45pm - 8pm (tmbarnes@ncsu.edu)

invite.ics Download this file

Look like a useful seminar.


Dear education informatics and games students,
Next Thursday we will have a meeting for all students wishing to apply for NSF and other grad fellowships to get together, and review past successful fellowship applications and review each other's draft materials to apply for fellowships.

People who should come: seniors and 1st and 2nd year grad students
AND grad students with fellowships
AND anyone else interested in getting grad school $$

I've requested EBII 3211, I'll confirm ASAP.

NSF Fellowship Application Reviews

Review NSF and other fellowship proposals for undergrads and new graduates applying this fall. There might be food.
When
Thu Oct 25 6:45pm – 8pm 
Eastern Time
Where
EB II (map)
Calendar
tmbarnes@ncsu.edu
Who
Tiffany Barnes
Going?   Yes - Maybe - No    more options »

Invitation from Google Calendar

You are receiving this email at the account tmbarnes@ncsu.edu because you are subscribed for invitations on calendar tmbarnes@ncsu.edu.

To stop receiving these notifications, please log in to https://www.google.com/calendar/ and change your notification settings for this calendar.





Friday, October 19, 2012

Find: NYT Viz - How States Votes Have Shifted

Interesting visualization of bipolar values over time. Careful design here. 

Over the Decades, How States Have Shifted

An interactive graphic shows the political evolution of each state from 1952 through 2008 and the states' current standing in the FiveThirtyEight forecast.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Find: Path co-founder Dustin Mierau - 'an app without design is like a good story printed on a dot matrix printer'

He likes Greensboro NC dev shop iconfactory. 

Path co-founder Dustin Mierau: 'an app without design is like a good story printed on a dot matrix printer'

dustin mierau path 1020

Dustin Mierau is co-founder and Chief Designer at Path, a journal and social network for Android and iPhone. Before Path, he co-founded Macster, which eventually became Napster for Mac. Mierau took a few minutes to talk to The Verge about the finer points of designing great software, how to stay focused, and about remembering the internet before it was filled with ads. You can find him on Twitter at @dmierau.

Friday, October 12, 2012

Job: 15k opportunity for an open source coder/programmer

This is a great cause. 

Best, Ben 

Friday, October 05, 2012

Find: Maybe this change will be good - Cliff Bleszinski leaves Epic Games

Creative genius Cliff Bleszinski leaves Epic Games

Cliff BleszinskiIn a blog post, Cary-based Epic Games tells its millions of fans worldwide that Cliff Bleszinski, a driving creative force behind many of its its such as "Gears of War," has left the firm. Bleszinki says he needs "a much needed break."

Thursday, October 04, 2012

Find: Frog's Mark Rolston - the 'Minority Report' interface is a 'terrible idea'

Some provocative thinking here. 

Frog's Mark Rolston: the 'Minority Report' interface is a 'terrible idea'

Mark Rolston Frog

Mark Rolston holds the title of chief creative officer for Frog, the venerable design company responsible for the look of Sony Trinitron televisions in the seventies and Apple's minimalistic "Snow White" design language of the eighties. In 1999, it was Mark who personally drove the creation of Dell.com to become the top-grossing e-commerce site in the world. Now, as a C-level executive with 18-years at Frog, Mark's responsible for driving the global creative vision for the 43-year old organization. More specifically, Mark's helping companies remove the "computer" from computing, making it a diffused and transparent part of our daily lives.

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

Find: Steve Jobs discusses 21st century technology in rare 1983 speech

A Steve jobs talk broken by our collaborators at cdi. 

Steve Jobs discusses 21st century technology in rare 1983 speech

1983 Steve Jobs speech tape

An additional 40 minutes of a speech that Steve Jobs gave at the International Design Conference in Aspen in 1983 has been released for the first time. The first 20 minutes of the recording were made available by the Center of Design Innovation in August, but answers to questions posed by the audience after Jobs’ initial speech were cut. After being handed a recording of the full session, Marcel Brown of Life, Liberty, and Technology made a digital copy, cleaning up background noise in the process before uploading the final copy for all to hear.

Jobs dives into several topics in the Q&A session, detailing how computers will become integral parts of everyday life while reshaping the way people communicate. The late Apple CEO also...

Monday, October 01, 2012

Find: Pew survey - Half of US adults now have smartphone or tablet, more reading in browser than apps

Survey: Half of US adults now have smartphone or tablet

News going mobile Half of all adult Americans now own either a tablet computer or a smartphone, and one-third use their mobile devices to view news stories and video clips at least once a week, a new report from Pew Research finds.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Spotted: MIT study reveals fonts used by car manufacturers can influence distracted driving

The real question: why was one font easier to read, and why only for men?

Study reveals fonts used by car manufacturers can influence distracted driving

MIT car font study

Researchers at MIT's Age Lab have discovered that the fonts car manufacturers choose for use with in-dash entertainment systems can impact the amount of time drivers spend distracted behind the wheel. Unlike the physical controls found in older cars (dials, knobs, etc.), a rise in digital user interfaces has had the unfortunate side effect of demanding more attention from drivers. The study involved a simulation in which participants were asked to perform routine tasks on a display not unlike those you'll find in many modern vehicles. Researchers tracked eye movements during each session and tested two typefaces on the screen: the first was Eurostyle, with Frutiger serving as the second and more "humanist" font.

Monday, September 24, 2012

Spotted: How Visualization Layout Relates to Locus of Control and Other Personality Factors

Looks very interesting... And to read this one. 
IEEE CS TVCG PrePrint: How Visualization Layout Relates to Locus of Control and Other Personality Factors

Existing research suggests that individual personality differences are correlated with a user's efficiency in solving problems with complex visualization systems. We extend this research by isolating factors in personality traits as well as in the visualizations that may contribute to this correlation. We focus on a trait known as "locus of control," which represents a person's tendency to see themselves as controlled by or in control of external events. We control extraneous factors and focus on the overall layout style of the visualizations. We conduct a user study with four visualizations that gradually shift from an indentation metaphor to a containment metaphor and compare the participants' speed, accuracy, and preference with their locus of control. We then conduct a followup study in which we use priming to influence participants' locus of control rating. Our findings demonstrate that there is indeed a correlation between the two: participants with an internal locus of control perform more poorly with visualizations that employ a containment metaphor, while those with an external locus of control perform well with such visualizations. These results suggest that correspondence between a user's frame of mind and visualization style is important for successful design.

Friday, September 21, 2012

Find: Why are we idiots about taking care of our health?

This is exactly the reason that I think mobiles and ux should become national priorities: they are the tools needed to affect unthinking behavior. 
Ars Technica Why are we idiots about taking care of our health?

Faced with a risk of communicable diseases, humans tend to be very responsive, altering their behavior and taking preventative measures. There are well understood risk factors for things like Lyme disease and hantavirus, and many people have managed to change their habits to minimize risk. Faced with the risk of a noncommunicable disease, like cancer or heart disease, we don't tend to do nearly as well, even when the risks are equally well understood.

Why are we so lousy at simple things like eating well and avoiding cigarettes? A perspective in this week's Science (part of a series on noncommunicable diseases) suggests we've been going at the problem all wrong. In general, we've been asking people to step back and think about things like eating well. But the authors of this piece point out that a lot of our problems take place precisely when we're not bothering to think. And the only way around that issue may be a bit of social engineering.

Many approaches to public health are based on what has been called the deficit model, which assumes that people just don't know enough about the risks associated with problematic behavior. If we just get them enough information, and maybe provide a bit of encouragement, then they'll stop smoking. Or hit the salad bar. Or do whatever is necessary to reduce their health risks.

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Spotted: Users love simple and familiar designs – Why websites need to make a great first impression

In other settings, visual complexity is more aesthetic, less. 

___

Users love simple and familiar designs – Why websites need to make a great first impression

Posted by Javier Bargas-Avila, Senior User Experience Researcher at YouTube UX Research

I’m sure you’ve experienced this at some point: You click on a link to a website, and after a quick glance you already know you’re not interested, so you click ‘back’ and head elsewhere. How did you make that snap judgment? Did you really read and process enough information to know that this website wasn’t what you were looking for? Or was it something more immediate?

We form first impressions of the people and things we encounter in our daily lives in an extraordinarily short timeframe. We know the first impression a website’s design creates is crucial in capturing users’ interest. In less than 50 milliseconds, users build an initial “gut feeling” that helps them decide whether they’ll stay or leave. This first impression depends on many factors: structure, colors, spacing, symmetry, amount of text, fonts, and more.

In our study we investigated how users' first impressions of websites are influenced by two design factors:

  1. Visual complexity -- how complex the visual design of a website looks 

  • Prototypicality -- how representative a design looks for a certain category of websites
  • We presented screenshots of existing websites that varied in both of these factors -- visual complexity and prototypicality -- and asked users to rate their beauty.


    The results show that both visual complexity and prototypicality play crucial roles in the process of forming an aesthetic judgment. It happens within incredibly short timeframes between 17 and 50 milliseconds. By comparison, the average blink of an eye takes 100 to 400 milliseconds.

    And these two factors are interrelated: if the visual complexity of a website is high, users perceive it as less beautiful, even if the design is familiar. And if the design is unfamiliar -- i.e., the site has low prototypicality -- users judge it as uglier, even if it’s simple.



    In other words, users strongly prefer website designs that look both simple (low complexity) and familiar (high prototypicality). That means if you’re designing a website, you’ll want to consider both factors. Designs that contradict what users typically expect of a website may hurt users’ first impression and damage their expectations.

    Wednesday, September 12, 2012

    Find: Food for thought - By 2020 The Size of Meaningful Compute Approaches Zero

    Today's smartphone power at <5mm^2 for <$10. 

    Truly smart displays will soon be reality. 

    Intel: By 2020 The Size of Meaningful Compute Approaches Zero

    Intel Labs is a super interesting arm of the company, responsible for developing technologies that would potentially go into products 5 - 10 years down the road. It's from the labs that we got things like BBUL packaging (still not deployed but neat nonetheless) and the first 10GHz x86 ALUs

    Today, on the day before IDF, Intel put together a collection of demos to give us insight into what the labs folks are working on. We're still an hour away from actual demos but Intel did share a super interesting slide, pictured above.

    Moore's Law and the (almost) ever shrinking transistor give us one of two things: more complexity/performance/features in a given die area, or the same performance in a steadily decreasing die area.

    Exploiting the latter benefit, we have the realization above. By 2020, which assuming a 2 year cadence between process nodes means we're talking about silicon built on a 5nm process, Intel expects that the size of "meaningful compute" approaches zero. It's not totally clear what Intel defines as meaningful compute, but if you keep in mind that a single AMD Jaguar core measures < 3mm^2 at 28nm, it's not a stretch to believe that we'd have quite a bit of compute available nearly for free at 5nm. Assuming perfect scaling (not going to happen), a 100mm^2 die at 22nm would measure only 6.25mm^2 at 5nm. Even if you don't get perfect scaling, Moore's Law can give us the performance we get in a smartphone today in a size that's small enough and cheap enough to make that we can integrate it anywhere (smart-tables anyone?).

    The idea of ubiquitous compute has been around for quite a while, but it's still mindblowing to think about what can happen once meaningful compute is really almost free. Remember that there's a direct relationship between the size of silicon and its cost. Today's 80 - 120mm^2 smartphone SoCs cost anywhere from $10 - $30 to integrate into a phone. If silicon with that level of complexity can be reduced in size to the point where we're looking at low single digit costs, the potential impact to new markets will be huge.

    Find: pcs begin supporting quad hd - Ivy Bridge Gets 4K Display Support ((tags: finds, quadhd, intel, displays)(

    Ivy Bridge Gets 4K Display Support in October

    This October Intel will be providing a driver update for Ivy Bridge that will enable 4K x 2K resolution support as well as hardware accelerated 4K video decode. You'll need to use two DP outputs to drive a 4K panel from an Ivy Bridge system, which unfortunately makes it so most existing Ivy Bridge systems won't be able to drive the higher resolution panels. 

     

    Haswell will support driving a 4K display off of a single DP output or HDMI.

    Event: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society cookout

    CookoutFlyer (1).pdf Download this file

    Human Factors is psychology with an engineering focus. Their interests are very related to our lab's.

    ---------- Forwarded message ----------
    From: Regina Tyree <rmtyree@ncsu.edu>

    The Human Factors and Ergonomics Society is hosting a cookout to introduce our field to students interested in Design in Computer Science. 

    Human Factors is applicable to the fields of Computer Science and Design in many ways. We research how humans interact with interfaces and apply the findings to improve upon various factors influencing these interactions. This can include anything from reducing errors or mistakes in usage to streamlining work flow. The ultimate goal is to use design principles and behavioral theories founded through research to optimize human well-being, system usability, and overall system performance. 

    Come to our cookout to learn more about HFES!  Here are the details:

    Day: Thursday, September 13
    Time: 5pm to 8ish (feel free to stop by anytime)
    Location: Owen/Tucker Beach on NCSU campus 
    Activities: Beach volleyball, corn hole, music

    A yearly membership with HFES is only $5.  Become a member at the cookout and get free food!  As a member of HFES, you will receive emails for job postings, be invited to social events and guest lectures, plus have a nationally recognized society to put on your resume or CV!

    We hope you will join us at the cookout!

    Sunday, September 09, 2012

    Press: Summer course project's app release party on Monday - WRAL

    Raleigh greenway iPhone app set for release

    2012 Downtown Raleigh SkylineBeginning Monday, residents can navigate the city of Raleigh's nature trails with an iPhone app.

    Monday, September 03, 2012

    Find: phone tech is NASA tech - cheap Android-based satellites with Nexus hardware later this year

    NASA set to launch cheap Android-based satellites with Nexus hardware later this year

    PhoneSat

    Faced with a shrinking budget, NASA will in many ways need to reinvent itself if the agency hopes to continue leading the charge in space exploration. There's perhaps no better example of that "do more with less" mantra than the PhoneSat project, the goal of which is to build the lowest-cost and easiest to assemble satellites ever placed into orbit. To create such a thing, engineers have turned to off-the-shelf consumer gadgets for parts, harnessing the internals of Google's Nexus hardware as the brains of the operation.

    Find: Valve will make hardware - maybe this will be the disruption the pc market needs

    Valve says it's jumping into the computer hardware business

    valve jump

    In a job listing for the "industrial designer" position on Valve's website, the company has finally made its hardware ambitions explicit: Valve says "we're frustrated by the lack of innovation of in the computer hardware space, so we're jumping in." The job listing says that "even in basic input, the keyboard and mouse, haven't really changed much in any meaningful way over the years," but stops short of naming alternative hardware. For months, evidence suggesting Valve's entrance to the hardware market has piled up: there's the rumored "Steam Box" platform, murmurs of a wearable computing project, and job listings for engineers.

    "There's a real void in the marketplace."

    Valve hasn't confirmed any specific plans for devices yet, but the...

    Sunday, September 02, 2012

    Press: Summer mobile course project RGreenway nears final release

    Our summer mobiles course citycamp project has taken on a life of its own! Great work everyone! 

    New mobile app will showcase Raleigh greenways

    Initially available for iPhones, the app will offer basic functions such as maps and access points, along with more advanced features that allow users to report maintenance issues.

    Thursday, August 30, 2012

    Event: TechRevolution Seminar focuses on local startup opportunities - 9/25/12

    Billy regularly visits our courses.

    ---------- Forwarded message ----------
    From: Billy Houghteling <billy_houghteling@ncsu.edu>
    Date: Wed, Aug 29, 2012 at 3:20 PM
    Subject: TechRevolution Seminar: September 25, 2012

    The Springboard Initiative and the Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) are excited to present our next innovation outreach event.  I hope you will have time to join us on September 25th for our TechRevolution seminar.  Our seminar topic will be "Funding Environment for University Startups " and will feature Mr. Robert J. Creeden, Executive Director of the Blackstone Entrepreneurs Network.


    For additional information and to register, please visit:


    http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e6b6t9w416f02b11&llr=crh9l7dab

    Best regards,

    Billy

    Find: Quad-HD TV hits shelves

    New dvd standard can't be far behind.  Still too big though. 

    Ultra-HD TV sets to hit shelves just in time for Christmas

    A new ultra-HD TV coming from Sony By December, U.S. stores will sell a TV set with four times the resolution of today's best HDTVs, Sony says. The set will measure 84 inches on the diagonal, making the screen area four times as large as the common 42-inch set.

    Friday, August 17, 2012

    Khan Academy Computer Science

    Khan Academy Computer Science Teaches You to Code Through Exploration [Video]


    Free tutorials website Khan Academy has launched new computer science tutorials designed to teach anyone programming. The Khan Academy Computer Science site throws you right into the code behind a range of projects, so you can learn by experimenting with the JavaScript code.

    John Resiq, noted creator of the jQuery JavaScript library, is heading the project. In his blog post about the new program, Resig explains the philosophy behind this kind of learning environment:

    When I look back at how I became interested in programming, or ask other programmers about how they started to program, the answer is very frequently: "I was given a [Basic/QBasic/Python] compiler and a bunch of programs and I wanted to understand how it all worked so I could write my own!" It was only after digging in to the code that the student wanted to understand how to tackle certain programmatic challenges – but they then did so with great gusto!


    The Khan Academy Computer Science program is a distillation of this process into it's purest form: Directly encouraging experimentation, exploration, and creativity as a direct gateway to deeper learning.


    Khan Academy joins several other free "learn to code" services, including previously mentioned Codecademy. The difference is that Khan Academy's tutorials are really self-directed—they're more like playgrounds, although walkthroughs are also available for more complex topics.

    Thursday, August 16, 2012

    Find: Twitter revs up mTurk with Clockwork Raven

    Looks handy!

    Crowdsourced data analysis with Clockwork Raven

    Today, we’re excited to open source Clockwork Raven, a web application that allows users to easily submit data to Mechanical Turk for manual review and then analyze that data. Clockwork Raven steps in to do what algorithms cannot: it sends your data analysis tasks to real people and gets fast, cheap and accurate results. We use Clockwork Raven to gather tens of thousands of judgments from Mechanical Turk users every week.

    Motivation

    We’re huge fans of human evaluation at Twitter and how it can aid data analysis. In the past, we’ve used systems like Mechanical Turk and CrowdFlower, as well as an internal system where we train dedicated reviewers and have them come in to our offices. However, as we scale up our usage of human evaluation, we needed a better system. This is why we built Clockwork Raven and designed it with several important goals in mind:

    Researchers achieve 'highest possible' 100,000dpi color laser printing

    Photon scale imagery. 

    Researchers achieve 'highest possible' 100,000dpi color laser printing

    lena nano (nature.com)

    Researchers in Singapore have achieved what they claim is the "highest possible resolution" for color laser printing. The team demonstrated the technique by printing the common Lena test image at just 50 by 50 micrometers and around 100,000dpi — any smaller and the light would bounce off each pixel and diffract, resulting in a blurry picture. The pixels are actually constructed from tiny pillars topped with gold and silver nanodisks, but an effect called plasmon resonance means it's possible to define the color of reflected light by varying the dots' diameters and the spaces between them.

    We've seen (and questioned the utility of) screens with Retina display-beating resolution, and color print technology has long been able to go beyond...